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BarryinIN

"...Greatest battle implement ever devised..."

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I'm sure you've all read the famous general Patton quote on the Garand rifle. If not, you're a commie pig. Anyway, in case you ever wondered where that came from, here it is:

I just thought you might like to know.

The 76th anniversary of it's adoption is coming up in four days.

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Good news! Looks like the decision to block importation of more than 86000 M1 Garands from South Korea has been reversed. They will be here by Summer time and they are being sold to the importers at $220 each.

Sounds like there is potential for a flood of $500 Korean War Garands... smile

Unfortunately, the 600,000 M1 Carbines that SK wanted to export were not allowed because they have a scary magazine that can hold more rounds. frown

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/01/116_103154.html

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I don't know. I've heard this a couple of times in the past two or three years and am at the "believe it when I see it" stage now. This article's claim that they were first made in 1926, will be imported for sale to Korean War veterans, and the Koreans are giving a retail price doesn't add to it's credibility. It sounds to me like an article written to stir interest and have us call and write congressmen asking where the $220 M-1s are.

I'd like to see it, but as I said, I'll believe it when I see it. Without getting too political, you have to ask why would the current administration change it's mind on this?

If they do come, don't expect much. The last time, in the late 80s, the M1 Carbines had some decent ones among them but I don't remember seeing a good Garand come back. I love the Garand and have a hard time passing up any, but never did buy a Korean one. I doubt they will be any better 25 years later.

I do think it will help the parts market. There should be quite a few that get parted out and there should be some OK parts there (and a lot that aren't, so choose carefully). There might be a bunch of decent receivers in there, which is a definite plus.

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Well, the auction has begun! S. Korea is allowing open bidding by US importers, now, which will end on June 25th. So far, so good! As long as there are no political hiccups, 84,417 Garands will be coming back home where they belong...

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The source of that is still the Korean Times, the same one as before.

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2012/04/116_109166.html

The only hard facts in there is that they have a bunch of Garands to sell and are taking bids. It also refers to recent US gov't approval of their importation. When was this and what was approved? I haven't heard a peep about this, and would think that it would be big news if this administration approved anything like this. The only thing I have read or heard came from the same source a while back. No names or documents are ever named.

I hope I'm wrong, but I'm sticking to my same theory that the Koreans are trying to get US gunowners to think they are arriving any day, so when they don't, they will put pressure on congressmen for them.

I have to say the Koreans are politically crafty about these things. The first bunch in the late 80s was not coming back no how no way, then all of a sudden they were here. So they have pulled it off before.

A lot has change since then however. Emphasis on change.

I'm also wondering how they can sell something we loaned/gave them in the first place. They dodged that somehow the first time but I doubt they will again.

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M1 Garands and Carbines were originally approved for sale to the US back in 2009, then the current administration reversed the decision in March of 2010. After a huge backlash from the gun rights organizations, only the M1 Garands were approved for import in Sept. 2011. The 600,000 Carbines are just too dangerous as they accept scary high capacity magazines and would somehow become the weapon of choice for gang bangers.

These rifles were not "lend/lease" rifles. Apparently S. Korea paid for them, although I suspect they didn't pay much!

The government of South Korea received a letter on Sept. 2nd 2011 from the US to allow the sale of the Garands.

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I guess they did buy some, or a lot, or got them as compensation for military bases.

I still will only believe it when I see it. Perhaps someone in the State Department OK'd it, but how high up? The assistant recreation coordinator? As long as there is someone senior to this person, it can all be stopped in a heartbeat. Who is Sec State? And who is her boss?

I really do hate to rain on the parade, but it doesn't look very hopeful to me. The only reason I can see any of those people letting them back into the country would be if they could feed them directly into a smelting furnace.

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I think the timing of this is on our side with the election coming up. Considering the uproar that was generated the first time they changed their minds and blocked the sale, I think another reversal on the decision would not be wise. Who knows though.

I've got a spot reserved in one of my safes just in case. smile

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Well, a few of the typical online retailers have received some of the M2 ball ammo from South Korea and have indicated that the Garands are on their way, although "a long way off." Could mean never, I suppose, especially since this particular vendor is showing S. Korean made ammo and saying it's USGI. ?

http://www.southernohiogun.com/ammo-mags-more/ammunition/30-06-military-surplus-ammo.html

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Update. I hear from a local retailer that Century Arms International won the bid for the S. Korean Garands and paid a pretty penny. I didn't get an exact figure, but it sounded like the importer paid as much or more than I was hoping to buy one for - around $500. frown

I guess I'll need to visit the CMP store instead.

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Service grade HRA (1955?), muzzle gauge 1, throat 2. Pristine crown. Mix of USGI parts but mostly HRA.

I've had it out to the range once and fired 5 clips through it to get it sighted in. Shoots great! I should have bought one of these rifles a long time ago. Very pleasant to shoot and accurate at 100 yds (longest distance I have easy access to).

I appreciate all of the tiny milled parts that make up the ammo following mechanism. Very complicated compared to the M1A. Progress. smile

Here's some pics...

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Nice! A lot of serious Garand people feel the HRAs are the best made ones. That should be an ideal rifle for a shooter- built by HRA, made after WWII and Korea, so probably not used as hard and subjected to wartime upkeep like most of them.

When I get home, I'll check the s/n in the books if you want, and get you a list of what revision (dash number) parts it "should" have. Ordinarily, the chances are hit and miss in that, but a newer rifle stands less chance of having the parts scattered to the winds an yours is about as late as it gets.

"I should have bought one of these rifles a ling time ago."

Everybody hear that?

They won't be around forever. The CMP WILL run out, circulation will slow, and then everybody's will suddenly be worth more. Get 'em while you can.

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That would be much appreciated! I'm a newbie when it comes to the details of parts on Garands and Carbines. In fact, that's one of the reasons I did not purchase one sooner as I don't know what to look for and I know that small details can make a big difference in price.

When I went to the CMP Store, I wasn't planning on purchasing a rifle and had just "stopped in" with my son to look around one Saturday.

Surrounded by so many fine looking rifles, I just had to take one home! How could I resist for only $625! It's really a bargain price for machine like this with nicely milled parts and deep, dark walnut furniture. It just feels 'right' in your hands, too.

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It's the first day of school for the kids tomorrow, so in the scramble getting everything ready tonight I haven't been able to look up what I wanted.

I can tell you that if (IF) the barrel is original, the barrel date of manufacture usually precedes receiver manufacture and assembly by three to four months. For example, a 3 55 barrel (Mar 1955) would usually be found on a rifle made in June or July 1955. Of course that is nowhere near 100%, but it can get most guns dated pretty close.

In Scott Duff's Post-WWII Garand book (older, not as detailed, compared to his WWII Garand book), the closest in serial number among the all-original ones he has data for is 5611276. It has a 1 55 barrel. That particular barrel is not an HRA barrel, but one from LMR (Line Material Corp, who made most of the barrels for the IHC Garands, and one of the more accurate makers).

The next one in line, about 40,000 rifles later, has a 12 54 barrel (later rifle with a one month older barrel), which goes to show that going off the barrel date is only a ballpark guess at best.

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I had my HRA (a 55XXXXX serial number that came from the CMP with a TE of 1 and ME of 1) out at the range just a couple days ago...and just finished cleaning it up a few minutes ago.

Went shooting with a former fighter pilot friend of mine - who's never shot a Garand before.

shocking...but true...and we brought my new 1911...to make it a complete "greatest generation" appreciation day...

Happy New Year!

Astro

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OK - I've been seriously bitten by the Garand bug... in addition to the HRA I mentioned above, I've now got Garand #2: Springfield Armory M-1D with a  reproduction scope.  It's a CMP rifle, so it's an authentic "D" but came without the scope or cheek pad.  The reproduction cheek pads all suck, by the way...but the scope is quite good.  

The reproduction scope mount had a couple of manufacturing flaws, and once I figured out what was going on with it, it's much better.  If you ever get one, check the fit between the mount and the receiver, there were some casting flaws that prevented good contact.  Further, and even more significant, perhaps, was the interference between the "clamshell" and the thumbscrew that attaches the mount to the receiver.  The scope continued to slip/shift in the mount despite proper torque on the screws.  Once I relieved a bit of material from the clamshell where it hit the thumbscrew, all is well.

I took the CMP "Advanced Maintenance Class" and built a SA special grade (all new wood, re-parkerized USGI parts, 1.0 serial number).  That's Garand #3

And, on order, is an International Harvester Service Grade from the CMP...which makes #4...

When it arrives, I'll post up a shooting report and some photos.

I still need a Winchester...

Cheers,

Astro

Edited by Astro14

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It's here - too busy to get to the range.  New CMP wood.  IHC receiver, LMR barrel with a 2/52 date.  SA bolt, SA Op Rod and SA trigger group.

I've got an IHC bolt, and a complete (all IHC) trigger group and I am considering buying an Op Rod to make it all IHC.  Not an original rifle, of course, but close to correct... I've seen the term "corrected" meaning, period parts swapped back in, I suppose?

It had an oddly modified Sear and the front hammer hooks were filed.  I contacted CMP and they sent new parts, no questions asked. I love their support.  I installed all new springs, and gauged everything.  It all looks good.  Gas cylinder still in spec. Op Rod still in spec.  Throat is a 1+ and muzzle is a 1.  

Very pleased with it overall as the LMR barrel is in great shape.  Nice clean bore and little wear.  The rest of the stuff, well, It's an old rifle, and I'm not worried about the mixed parts.  I just want the others in stock to be able to "correct" it, should I choose...

 

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